English » The Vigeland Park » The Bridge

The Bridge

The 100 m long and 15 m wide bridge, lined with lanterns and sculptures on the granite parapets, is built on top of an old bridge constructed in 1914. Vigeland designed the new bridge and modelled in the years 1925 to 1933 the 58 sculptures in bronze. These include a rich variety of children, women and men in different ages, some alone, others in groups. Dominant motifs are the relationships between man and woman, adults and children. Stationary figures that flank the cube formed lanterns alternate with dynamic groups. By the run of the waterfall the bridge widens to each side and is marked with figures surrounded by massive bronze wheels. Here you will also find Sinnataggen, the little Angry Boy.

In spite of his size, the little boy is one of the most popular figures in the park. Although the sculptures on the bridge were among the latest Vigeland made for the park, they were the first to be installed. Already in the summer of 1940, when the rest of the park still was a large construction area, the bridge was opened to the public. At this time the four tall granite columns portraying humans fighting lizards were also erected. These show demons in absolute control of their victims, and represent a dramatic contrast to the more unconcerned play and joy of life depicted on the bridge.

Below the bridge is a circular playground with eight bronze sculptures of small children. In the centre, mounted on a small granite column, is the figure of an unborn child. Vigeland also designed a children's ferry to the amusement of the park's younger visitors, and the boat had its monumental granite wharf a few steps further down from the Children's Playground. For many years after the second world war it sailed around where today only swans and ducks swim. Inspired by other public parks in Europe, Vigeland also wanted rowing boats in the upper pond. This plan was, however, never carried out.